ESP Rv-300kh Kai Hansen guitar

ESP Rv-300kh Kai Hansen guitar

ESP Rv-300kh Kai Hansen

For almost 20 years, Hansen has played ESP Guitars. He first started using them during his days with Helloween after hearing testimonials of ESP from artists such as George Lynch and Kirk Hammett of Metallica. Kai Hansen almost exclusively plays Flying V guitars (even his accoustic guitar is a Flying V), his most famous guitar without doubt being the pink ESP Flying V he can be seen playing on the official video for I Want Out, or the Unisonic video Unisonic. Almost as famous as the pink V is the red one, also an ESP*. Kai has used ESP for approximately 20 years and he was endorser for ESP where he has (or had) an own signature guitar-ESP RV-300KH.

Our Replicated ESP Rv-300kh Kai Hansen for sale

About the original ESP Kai Hansen Rv-300kh, we think we needn’t say more. If you are a fan of Hansen, you will know this is a very typical guitar of Hansen’s, which has accompanied Hansen to show lots of concerts and it is Hansen’ favorite guitar. The ESP Kai Hansen Rv-300kh features a rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets, perfect for comfort and speed in any playing style. Gold hardware accents the rock-ready vibe.

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ESP LTD Richie Sambora SA2

ESP LTD Richie Sambora SA2

About the original ESP LTD SA-2, we think we needn’t say more. If you are a fan of Sambora, you will know this is a very typical guitar of his, which has accompanied Sambora to show lots of concerts and it is Sambora’ favorite guitar. The ESP LTD SA-2 guitar’s neck features a fast thin U-shaped profile and a rosewood fingerboard with 22 extra jumbo frets, perfect for comfort and speed in any playing style. Chrome hardware accents the rock-ready vibe. Both with Bon Jovi and solo, Richie Sambora has been thrilling audiences with his versatile guitar playing and songwriting since 1983.

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ESP Kirk Hammentt Signature KH 2

In most respects the limited edition ESP KH-2 Kirk Hammett Signature Series Electric Guitar is an M-II Deluxe that’s been loaded with screaming EMG-81/60 active humbuckers. The extra thin flat neck has a 24 extra-jumbo fret fingerboard to provide a springboard to intense, fleet-fingered flurries of riffage and extreme note bending. The finely crafted skull-and-crossbones pearl inlays add an extra dollop of menace. Includes hardshell case.

ESP Kirk Hammentt Signature KH 2

Our Replicated KH2 Kirk Hammett Signature

Look, the odds of a KH-2 ESP turning up for sale today are about zero. The closest we will ever get to owning one is with this once-in-a-lifetime Limited Edition guitar. But considering the fact that ESP is only building two in snow white of them, this is guaranteed to be a precious commodity somewhere down the road. But even you are lucky enough to find one, the price will be sky-high. Few people can afford it.

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James hetfields

Celebrate James Hetfield’s 49th Birthday By Watching Awesome Metallica Moments
As of today, Metallica frontman James Hetfield has one more year to live until he turns (gasp!) 50! Over the past three decades or so, he’s led an extraordinary life as the fearless leader of the thrash icons: He helped invent speed-metal’s signature guitar sound, he wrote songs that influenced artists ranging from Slayer to Shakira and he has had the opportunity to jam with people who have influenced him over the years like members of Black Sabbath and Queen. He’s always projected a level of poise, even during times he was admittedly uncomfortable (see photoshoots around Load), and yet he’s never lost sight of his sense of humor. So to help Jaymz, as he used to call himself, celebrate final year of his 40s, we’ve trawled YouTube to find his five most-awesome onstage moments.

James Hetfield crowdbaits fans at the 1983 release party for Kill ‘Em All
This video of Metallica playing “Metal Militia” would be impressive on its own, were it not just to watch early Het command a thrash classic alongside original bassist Cliff Burton and Kirk Hammett wearing an unusually décolleté white shirt. What makes it more exciting though is that five minutes in, after they finish the song and launch into a boogie-woogie instrumental, the frontman pulls out a freshly minted copy of their debut and begins crowd-baiting. “Lookee what I got,” he says. “The debut album, out on Megaforce Records, it’s called Kill ‘Em All, and we’re glad to kill all you tonight. Who wants this fucker?” After it disappears into a mosh pit, Hetfield exclaims, “I don’t think anybody got that. We broke another one.” Watch the video to hear what Hetfield originally wanted to call the album, before he says, “Kill all the record distributors.”

Buy James Hetfield’s sunglasses

That right there is the Hetfield, a limited-edition sunglass frame designed by Metallica frontman James Hetifeld. And it can be yours for just $219 (via Blabbermouth):

The Hetfield is a classic shape with a rock-star edge. This frame is as smooth and as fast as James’ Lincoln Zephyr v12. Using Zeiss optics and the Sutro stainless steel 3Click hinge, this frame is designed to take whatever a 24-stop Eastern European tour can throw at it. It will not lose screws, is 10 times stronger than a traditional hinge and gives the frame a structure that stays tight over time. Zeiss polycarbonate lenses block 100 percent of both UVA and UVB sun rays and provide the ultimate in impact resistance with the industry’s toughest hard coating for superior scratch resistance. These limited-edition frames are road-worthy and built to last!


James hetfield 80s

James Hetfield

Metallica’s James Hetfield Still Aiding the Search for Morgan Harrington’s Killer
By Chad Childers June 14, 2012 | UltimateClassicRock.com

The tragic deaths of concert-goers can very understandably hit close for bands, and the October 2009 loss of Metallica fan Morgan Harrington has the group still doing their part to find the killer.

The tragic deaths of concert-goers can very understandably hit close for bands, and the October 2009 loss of Metallica fan Morgan Harrington has the group still doing their part to find the killer.

For those who don’t remember, Harrington went missing shortly after attending a Metallica show. When they heard about the case, the band used their public platform to aid in search for the missing college student. A little while later, Harrington’s remains were discovered.

Though two years have passed, the group is still aiding in the search for the killer. Singer James Hetfield has just filmed a video plea seeking further information as the killer is still at large.

In his clip, the singer states, “Back in 2010, our band offered $50,000 to help catch the person who was responsible for murdering Morgan Harrington. Since that time, authorities uncovered new evidence linking her killer to a similar assault to a woman in Virginia.”

The video shows a police sketch of the suspect, as Hetfield asks that anyone who recognizes the person or has information regarding the case to call the local police or submit their information online.

He adds, “Remember, any information, no matter how small you might think it is, could be that crucial piece that investigators need to help solve the case.”

At present, there’s up $150,000 reward for the capture of the killer. Hetfield urges anyone with information to contact the Virginia State Police tip line listed in the video.

Watch James Hetfield’s Plea for Information Regarding Morgan Harrington’s Killer


James hetfield t shirts

Metallica T Shirt – James Hetfield
£ 16.99

James Hetfield t shirt

Price: £14.99

Product details
Boxed-product Weight: 5 g
Delivery Destinations: Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
Find out more about our Delivery Rates and Returns Policy
ASIN: B003S5M386
Date first available at Amazon.co.uk: 15 Jun 2010
Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 102,004 in Clothing (See Top 100 in Clothing)

Product Description
Black Gildan t shirt with 2 colour grey screen print

Price: €20 €12

by MADNESS

100% premium quality cotton.
Please make sure that you order the right size.
You may return any item you order from us but you have to pay the shipping cost yourself.

Sizing guide for this T-shirt. (+- 1.5 cm / 0.5 inch)Measure S – Small M – Medium L – Large XL – Extra Large
Pit-to-Pit 45 cm / 17.5 inch 48 cm / 19 inch 51 cm / 20 inch 55 cm 21.5 inch
Shoulder-to-Waist 70 cm / 27.5 inch 73 cm / 29 inch 75 cm / 29.5 inch 79 cm / 31 inch


James hetfield glasses

Metallica’s James Hetfield Starts His Own Line of Sunglasses
The singer has partnered with San Francisco-based Sutro Eyewear to created the limited-edition JH Sutro Sunglasses called “the Hetfield.

When it comes to cool eyewear, ladies want to look like movie stars or models, but guys probably prefer to look like rock stars or sports stars.
our editor recommends
Metallica’s James Hetfield Creates PSA to Help FBI Catch Fan’s Killer (Video)

To that end, Metallica frontman James Hetfield has partnered with Sutro Eyewear to launch the limited-edition JH Sutro Sunglasses. His model is duly dubbed “the Hetfield,” which comes in black and tortoise versions.

They look a bit between a Ray-Ban shape and something much more biker or punk. Hetfield describes them as “built to look faster than a speeding riff and to handle the life of a road dog like me.”

The glasses’ hinges are said to be 10 times stronger than normal sunglass hinges. They retail for $219.99 and are a good middleground between a classic frame shape — one that reads “grown-up” — and one that reads “rocker dude.” The price is also a nice compromise between designer shades by Tom Ford, which run about $400, and Ray-Bans, which run about $125.

Metal and rock kids everywhere will be grabbing these up, although they’re a bit pricey for the average metal head, aren’t they? They’ve got a nice “tough” feeling and a good rocker edge. What they don’t have, however, is any hint of femininity, so it’s doubtful girls will go for them. So what’s next? Sunglasses from Justin Bieber, Kanye West — or the hologrammed Tupac Shakur? None of this seems particularly unlikely.

Buy James Hetfield’s sunglasses
That right there is the Hetfield, a limited-edition sunglass frame designed by Metallica frontman James Hetifeld. And it can be yours for just $219 (via Blabbermouth):

The Hetfield is a classic shape with a rock-star edge. This frame is as smooth and as fast as James’ Lincoln Zephyr v12. Using Zeiss optics and the Sutro stainless steel 3Click hinge, this frame is designed to take whatever a 24-stop Eastern European tour can throw at it. It will not lose screws, is 10 times stronger than a traditional hinge and gives the frame a structure that stays tight over time. Zeiss polycarbonate lenses block 100 percent of both UVA and UVB sun rays and provide the ultimate in impact resistance with the industry’s toughest hard coating for superior scratch resistance. These limited-edition frames are road-worthy and built to last!


James hetfield 1986

JAMES HETFIELD AND KIRK HAMMETT – THRASHER MAGAZINE 1986

Interview by Pushead

PUSHEAD: SO THE NEW RECORD “MASTER OF PUPPETS,” IS OUT AND IT’S PRETTY CLOSE TO A GOLD RECORD AT THIS POINT, WHAT DO YOU GUYS THINK OF THAT?

James: I’ll stick it up in my storage place.

Kirk: I’ll give mine to my mom.

YOU COULD SELL IT AND BUY AN APARTMENT FOR A COUPLE OF MONTHS. THAT’S THE WEIRDEST THING, HERE YOU GUYS ARE, RIDING ON A SUCCESS, RIGHT? YOU’RE ON A SUCCESSFUL TOUR, YOU HAVE A SUCCESSFUL ALBUM, EVERYTHING’S DOING WELL AND YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE A PLACE TO LIVE.

J: No.

WILL YOU EVER?

J: I don’t know.

K: I need a place to store my comic books when I’m out on the road.

J: We’ve got some stuff, I’ve got a bed and all that crap, it’s just in storage. It sucks. I’ve got an address where I can get mail.

AND YOU GUYS ARE ON ALLOWANCES AND STUFF LIKE THAT?

K: Yeah, we have accountants. Now I get to buy the comics I’ve been wanting since I was a little kid. I can pay more attention now to my hobbies. When I was younger, I was always into comics and I never had enough money to buy Fantastic Four number 1, which I just got today, because of the price.

BUT ISN’T THE PRICE MORE NOW THAN IT WAS THEN?

K: Yeah, but when you think about it it’s pretty much the same price–what was a quarter back then is a dollar now, it’s still at the same distance.

ARE YOU BUYING THESE AS AN INVESTMENT?

K: Sure, they’re a good investment and I do buy certain comics as investments, but I’m not into this hobby just to make money. That sucks, that’s more like a broker or something. I don’t buy it as much for the monetary value, though, as I do for just sentimental reasons and from a collector’s point of view.

J: I’ve got two Dennis The Menace that HE gave me. I’m going to save them forever.

WHAT IS YOUR REASON FOR GETTING INTO THE COMICS, JAPANESE TOYS AND THE HORROR STUFF?

K: The reason I buy toys and stuff is it’s good plain fun. I’ll admit it, I used to spend a lot of money on drugs at one point.

WHY?

J: Yeah, why?

K: Because I thought maybe drugs were fun…

J: Why?

K: Until drugs all of the sudden weren’t very fun at all…

J: Why?

K: And it was like a huge illusion. And I thought drugs brought me a certain kind of joy…

J: Why?

K: But, they don’t… shut up, James… they stopped bringing me a lot of joy. And around the same time I was buying comics and toys and they were bringing me a lot of, for want of a better word… fun. It’s healthier for me and I have something to show for it.

J: Do you think comics saved you from drugs? Spiderman saved me, dude.(laughs)

K: I’ve talked to friends who have made a lot of money and asked themselves, ‘Where has all my money gone?,’ and the answer was always, ‘Well, it all went into drugs and booze and such.’ And I asked myself that same question and I have something to show for it, my money went into toys and comics and I got a lot of fun out of it and I’m a lot healthier to boot. They can still bring me a lot of fun.

J: What about comic books about drugs?

K: Those are the best ones.

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE GROWING TREND OF OLDER PEOPLE WHO ARE INVOLVED IN SOMETHING THAT MOST PEOPLE SAY IS FOR LITTLE KIDS?

K: A lot of people make the association of comics and toys with youth. They put two and two together, when I was younger I played with toys and they were a lot of fun. But, why should anyone say that should end because you’re older? There’s absolutely no reason why that should end. I mean, it might appear to be an immature kind of thing to do, but if you think about it, what’s so immature about wanting to have fun? People still go to the movies to have fun. It’s just another form of play.

WOULD YOU SAY THAT YOU HAVE AN ADDICTIVE HOBBY?

K: To obtain the unobtainable is a real rush in itself, like to see something in a magazine and go, ‘Wow, I’d really like to have this…’

WHEN YOU’RE PLAYING ARE YOU PERFORMING A LITTLE BETTER BECAUSE YOU HAVE OTHER GOALS THAT YOU CAN ACCOMPLISH WITH THAT?

K: The musicianship is an entirely different thing altogether. The music comes first and any sort of thing on the side I think of a lot farther down the line. I don’t go into studio thinking, well, you know, we’re going to have to write some great songs so I can buy some great comic books. It does keep everything together because I have a more sound mind and a healthier attitude toward the lifestyle in general. Of course, if my hobby was to get totally screwed up every night and blow my brains out every night, I’d be a crash and burn individual. If my hobby is to collect comic books and have a real sound mind, doing better in health… comic books are inspiring to me. There are a lot of ideas that I can find in comic books that I can interpret through music. It’s just better in the overall picture to be able to think clearly and to relate my music better. It’s real complicated, I never really looked at it like that before.

AN ESCAPE?

K: Yeah, you could call it an escape. It’s hard to say whether I really needed an escape. I didn’t really watch a lot of TV. I wasn’t a TV kid, I was more of a comic book kid. You know, you get TV kids and comic book kids. It’s as much of an escape as television. Everyone needs that sort of entertainment. I collected that stuff for a long time and then I bought a guitar and got totally obsessed with playing guitar. I kind of backed-down on the comics and played the guitar a lot.

AND NOW THE TWO HOBBIES HAVE KIND OF MATCHED…

K: Yeah, they’ve come back together, because while I was playing guitar I would walk into a comic book store and see comics that I used to have and say, ‘wow, I used to have that,’ and I slowly came to realize that I still wanted it so I got back into collecting comics and collecting the things I like the most which are the horror comics. The EC’s and Famous Monsters and just the whole horror genre in particular. When I was even younger, I was a big fan of Walt Disney.

IS THERE ANYTHING NEW THAT YOU LIKE OR IS ONLY THE OLDER STUFF GOOD?

K: A lot of the new stuff is real good too. There’s a lot more violence in comics now…

IS THAT GOOD OR BAD?

K: I think it’s great. It’s entertaining. It’s making comic books more interesting, because back when I was reading comic books there was a comics code, which is like the equivalent of like a PG rating at a movie. The underground comics were a lot more lenient and underground comics are more like an R-rated movie. Let’s face it, most of the time an R-rated movie is better than a PG-rated movie. There’s a lot of good stuff out there nowadays, like Mr. Monster, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. And there’s other stuff like Dark Knight. It’s really good because it puts Batman in a more realistic setting. It’s Batman, he’s middle-aged, he’s retiring and he’s freaking out because his profession of stopping crime is turning him into a loony case. It is like a social statement because he is becoming what he once chased after… you could relate that to something like a song like “Sanitarium”….

METALLICA, IS PLAYING A QUICKER, RAW BUT POLISHED SOUND THAT MOST PEOPLE SAY IS A VIOLENT TYPE OF MUSIC. DO YOU THINK THAT’S THE WAY THE WORLD IS HAPPENING? ARE YOU GUYS REALLY SCREAMING AT PEOPLE, SAYING, ‘LOOK WHAT’S HAPPENING.’?

K: Yeah, I think you’ve got a point there. People can relate to that because it’s more like the world as it really is. I mean, let’s face it, the world is not a pretty place. The world is pretty sick. There’s a lot of ugly things out there and no matter how much you try and escape you always have to wake up and face the fact that the world is fucked-up and ugly.

IS THAT SOMETHING YOU WANT TO TELL PEOPLE IN YOUR MUSIC?

J: Hell no. I don’t want to tell people what to do because I hate people telling me what to do….

YOU GUYS ARE NOW IN A POSITION WHERE SOME PEOPLE TAKE WHATEVER YOU SAY LITERALLY, THEY CAN EVEN TAKE IT THE WRONG WAY.

J: Yeah, a lot.

K: It’s happened in the past, people have taken us wrong.

J: And then that’s what gives the band a bad reputation. It’s utter bullshit.

K: When we’re taken wrong and bad things happen, like people get hurt, there’s other people who are quick to bring blame, even though it’s a personal motivation on that person’s part. The person takes us wrong and brings harm to other people for whatever reason. That’s fucked up, because a lot of the times it’s the person themselves and not us who are really saying the wrong things.

J: All these freak people are trying to build in this huge symbolism between the music they listen to and the lyrics and why they did this…the lyrics I write I write pretty much for myself. I’m not telling people how to think. Like, ‘If you don’t believe the way I do then you’re not a real Metallica fan,’ or some shit like that.

YOU’RE JUST PUTTING OUT AN OPINION…

J: My opinion.

THEN DOES THE WHOLE BAND AGREE WITH YOUR OPINION?

K: I do. I feel that we pretty much stand behind anything he has to say. If we didn’t stand behind it we would let him know that in advance. So far we haven’t so we pretty much stand behind everything James says.

J: We talk about topics, concepts…

ARE YOU HAPPY WITH THE SUCCESS THAT YOU HAVE FROM WHAT YOU’RE DOING?

J: We’re doing it our way, we’ve always wanted to do it our way, I’m happy with it. We haven’t had to conform to any certain standards, record companies or whoever else wants us to do it. They haven’t molded us a certain way, we did it all ourselves and that’s great. I used to think back, and go, ‘Oh my God, I saw us in Circus or Hit Parader or I saw us in that magazine, oh shit, I hate it.’

WHY DID YOU HATE IT?

J: Because it’s so widespread, people see you in the magazine, ‘Oh wow another band blowing it.’ But we’re doing it our way. We’re saying what we want to say in interviews and they’re not twisting the shit around.

DO YOU THINK YOU’LL COME TO A POINT WHERE YOU HAVE TO WRITE A RADIO HIT, OR YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE TO MAKE A VIDEO?

K: If it happens, it happens by accident.

J: No. We’re not worried about that. You start thinking too far ahead and you start fucking yourself up.

K: I don’t think we’ve ever regretted anything we’ve done.

I GOT THE OPPORTUNITY TO GO WITH YOU GUYS ON THE BUS, YOU HAVE ALL THESE PEOPLE RUNNING ALL THIS STUFF AND YOU GUYS DON’T EVEN HAVE TO TALK TO THEM BECAUSE YOU TRUST THEM TO DO THIS OR THAT, THEN YOU GET TO THE ARENA AND YOU AND KIRK GO TO THE CLOSET, GRAB YOUR SKATEBOARDS AND HOP OUT AND YOU TAKE OFF. IS THAT LIKE A RELEASE FOR YOU GUYS?

J: There’s nothing else to do. Our guys are setting up our shit and…

K: The thing with all these people is, we work with them. Those people don’t work for us, they work with us. We’re all like a huge bunch of family.

J: We all travel together.

K: We’re like a gang. They have their jobs, we have our jobs. Our jobs don’t start until 7:30 or so, so we just wait around, skate…

IS BEING ON TOUR BORING?

K: A lot of the times.

J: It depends on where you are, but with a skate, if you’re bored you’ve always got something to do.

SO THE TWO OF YOU GOT STARTED SKATEBOARDING THROUGH BOREDOMN ON TOUR?

K: It just seemed like a real good idea.

J: It’s just kind of so we can flip away from all the hectic shit for awhile.

DO YOU GET ANY HASSLES OR ANYTHING WHEN YOU’RE SKATING?

K: Yeah, I get hassled by security guards but I just go on.

DO THEY REALIZE YOU GUYS ARE THE BAND OR DO THEY THINK YOU’RE SOME LITTLE ROADIE?

J: No way, hell no. They just think we’re freaks coming to watch the shows.

K: I just go to another floor and skate. Fuck that.

SO ARE YOU HAVING A GOOD TIME SKATING WHEN YOU’RE AT THESE ARENAS?

J: Hell yeah.

K: The polished floors are really cool.

J: Well, it’s best when there’s no seats. A lot of the places have got seats.

HOW DID YOU GET INTO THIS SKATING THING?

J: Wanted something to do on tour, because there was a lot of idle time when we’re not doing anything. And I don’t drink as much as I used to so it mellows me.

IS THAT GOOD OR BAD?

J: I think it’s good.

YOU GOT HURT ONCE DIDN’T YOU?

J: There was a couple of shows where I had to have my ankle taped up. For like a week. It was banged up and twisted and…

SINCE YOU GUYS HAVE STARTED THIS TOUR WITH OZZY, YOU’VE GOT A LITTLE FAMILY OF SKATEBOARDING HAPPENING ON THIS BIG TOUR, CORRECT?

K: Yeah, some people on Ozzy’s crew and Ozzy’s band.

J: Yeah, guitarist Jake and his roadie are skating together now too. They saw us with our boards and go, ‘hey, fuck yeah, that’s a good idea.’

AND THE MANAGEMENT’S NOT GIVING YOU ANY HASSLES BECAUSE YOU’RE VALUABLE?

J: We told the management, ‘hey, look we’re thinking about taking boards out on tour’…I thought he was going to go, ‘oh shit, no way, you can’t.’ He just said, ‘well, you break something, you still play.’

K: Yeah, ‘You break a leg on your skateboard you play on stage with a broken leg.’

YOU GUYS HAVE BEEN KNOWN TO ADMIRE THE MISFITS.

K: Hi Glenn. Fuck yeah.

AND YOU’RE GOING TO DO A COVER OF ONE OF THEIR SONGS, THAT’S WHAT THE WORD IS…

K: Yep. This is true. They’re great.

WHAT GOT YOU INTO THE MISFITS? DOES IT GO WITH THE PUNK THING?

J: Cliff turned us on to them.

J: All of his friends were into them and he taped some stuff from his friends.

K: It just grew on us and we started listening to it a lot. I like the Misfits. I liked the songs and then I saw pictures of them and went, ‘Wow, this is cool.’ The imagery that they used was like some of the stuff I’ve seen in old horror comics.

JAMES, WHAT ARE YOU INTO, BESIDES TV?

J: Live comedy. I’m into the Bobcat (Bob Goldthwait) and Sam Kinnison.

K: Cliff’s into Dawn of the Dead type stuff, stuff like that.

HOW COME YOU DON’T HAVE COSTUMES?

J: Yeah, we still haven’t got our costumes back yet. Ozzy said we couldn’t wear them. We’ve got our red, white and blue sparkly suits. (laughs)

WHERE’S THE MAKE-UP AND THE STUDS?

K: They got rusty and fell off because we sweat too much.

YOU HAVE A WHOLE CONCEPT BEHIND “MASTER OF PUPPETS”, RIGHT, IS THAT WHY YOU HAVE THE CROSSES AND THE WHOLE THING ON STAGE?

J: Yeah, I think it’s cool, something new. Last year we had our stacks…We’re supposed to be playing in the Aldacomet or whatever.

K: It kind of helps the concept of the album too.

WHAT IS THE CONCEPT OF THE ALBUM?

K: Manipulation. Various forms of manipulation, which can go into entirely a different subjects which we could talk about for hours.

WHY ARE YOU SAYING “MASTER OF PUPPETS”? IS IT SOMETHING THAT YOU’VE FELT HAS BEEN DONE TO YOU OR THAT YOU SEE BEING DONE TO YOUR FRIENDS?

J: Nah, I see it done to different people. Some of the stuff…well “Master of Puppets” deals pretty much with drugs. How things get switched around, instead of you controlling what you’re taking and doing it’s drugs controlling you. Like, I went to a party here in S.F., there were all these freaks shooting up and geezin’ and this other girl was real sick.

DOES THAT SCARE YOU?

J: Yeah, hella.

ARE YOU GUYS GETTING TO THE POINT WHERE YOU’RE BECOMING AN ANTI-DRUG BAND?

J: No, because we don’t want to tell anyone what to do. If people are into it that’s cool, they wouldn’t mind about the subject we’re talking about. I was at that party and it freaked me out and I’m hella paranoid.

K: We run into a lot of freaks on the road messed-up on drugs, all the time.

J: That’s what happened at the last show…

K: Yeah, someone O.D.ed at the L.A. show.

J: Three people died.

BUT THAT’S NOT YOUR RESPONSIBILITY THOUGH…

J: ‘Oh, of course it is,’ all the mom’s say.

K: The P.M.R.C., they don’t know about it yet, but if they did know about it they’d raise a fucking all-holy ruckus.

J: “Leper Messiah” deals with how people bow to TV preachers and send all their money away… it’s just that we’re aware of the fact that shit like this happens.

WHAT’S THE FEELING FOR YOU GUYS WHEN YOU’RE PLAYING LIVE?

K: It’s a lot of fun. Just go out there and bash it out, you know, have a lot of fun while we’re doing it and if other people dig it, cool.

EVEN WHEN YOU’RE PLAYING THE SAME SONG EVERY NIGHT?

K: Yeah, we still get into it.

J: It’s a different feeling every night, different people there. It’s cool to freak people out too. A lot of people will be sitting there and don’t know what the hell… and you just go over and throw a beer on them. And then they go, ‘Oh my God, you’re gettin’ out of control.’ Some people who come to gigs are so lame. They sit there, they pay all this money to get front row, ‘Yeah!,’ and they sit down. Like man, what the fuck.

YOU GET NERVOUS UP THERE IN FRONT OF A CROWD?

J: I get nervous every night. Before I go on I feel like barfing my guts out. Not nervous really, just a kind of excitement. Like, ‘Oh my God, I’m going to forget this, I’m going to forget the lyrics, I’m going to forget how to play guitar…’

K: Yeah, I’d say it’s adrenaline that’s building up, a lot of it’s nervous energy.

WELL, HERE YOU ARE PLAYING FOR A CROWD OF LIKE 20,000…

J: I don’t even think of that. I don’t think, ‘Oh God, how many people are going to be here tonight?’ I just go out there and play.

K: When you go out there and bash it out it brings up a rush of adrenaline. Adrenaline is flowing and along with that is a touch of nervous energy. The adrenaline like totally takes over when you get up on stage and start playing and having a lot of fun. Then you forget the nervous energy. But I get nervous…

DOES IT BOTHER YOU THAT THEY SIT THERE? ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO AMP OUT?

J: Not really, I like watching that though. It’s kind of hard for kids to get a huge pit going when there’s all these chairs happening. Kids have fun their own way. That’s the way I have fun, so maybe they do it my way. You know, you gotta have some fun. A lot of time they’re just sitting there having fun their way, you don’t realize that’s how they have fun. But, we’re not out there goin, ‘OK, everybody, give me your cigarette lighters, everybody go like this.’

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE OR ANYTHING THAT YOU WOULD TELL PEOPLE?

K: Be honest with yourself.

J: Honest. Get some originality happening and be aware of certain positions you could get stuck into as far as management and record companies.

K: Be aware of the fact that it is a business and you have to have a business-like attitude, because people will fuck you up any chance they get.

LIKE PEOPLE USING YOU?

J: I hate the business side of it all. I go to all of our band meetings or wherever and end up falling asleep.

K: I do too, I have a lot of contempt for it. You really have to pay attention whether you like it or not. There has to be someone in the band who is aware of what can happen and what is happening all the time. It’s really easy to get fucked over. So easy.

IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE THAT JAMES AND KIRK HAVE TO SAY FOR METALLICA?

K: Don’t lie to yourself. Don’t try to be something you’re not.

J: Hey, I’m eight feet tall.

K: No you’re not.

J: People have to be confident in what they’re doing, if they’re not then people will step all over them. Confidence in yourself.

IS IT HARD TO SOMETIMES REALIZE THAT YOU GUYS ARE BEING USED?

J: I get pissed-off once in awhile listening to bootleggers out there. I almost fucking slammed one of them, then I realized, shit, I might get arrested and then I can’t play the show. Yeah, you gotta think ahead…at least one hour.


James hetfield guitar

James Hetfield
Metallica

James Hetfield is probably one of the most recognized figures in the world of rock and metal, being the co-founder, main songwriter, and vocalist/rhythm guitar player for Metallica.Hetfield has been a major endorser of ESP guitars since the 1980s, and is best known for playing custom-made Explorer-style guitars with the EMG-81 inthe bridge and the EMG-60 in the neck and most recently collaborated with EMG founder Rob Turner on his signature EMG-JH Set. Hetfield’s main guitar from the early days was a Gibson Flying V, used almost exclusively until about 1984 when he switched to the Gibson Explorer model.

SPECIFICATIONS CONTROLS FINISHES
Set-Neck Construction
24.75″ Scale
Mahogany Body
Mahogany Neck
Ebony Fingerboard
42mm Bone Nut
Thin U Neck Contour 22 XJ Frets
Black Hardware
ESP Locking Tuners
Tonepros Locking TOM Bridge & Tailpiece
EMG JH SET Active p.u.
Finish: BLK, SW (Snow White) 3-Way Switch
Neck Volume
Bridge Volume

James Hetfield does more than just provide the band Metallica with growling vocals – he is also the bands rythym guitarist. Let’s checkout his gear.

Let’s see what guitar gear and equipment Metallica’s James Hetfield’s has been seen using in his guitar rig.


James hetfield and wife

James Hetfield: “Fame and Fortune Doesn’t Fill The Hole That A Father Leaves”
James Hetfield: “Fame and Fortune Doesn’t Fill The Hole That A Father Leaves.”
A RMM Feature by jhs on Hetfield and Hunt’s Absent Screening Q and A
additional reporting and research by sms

James Hetfield values honesty. He speaks it. He lives his life by it.

Tonight, he is using his honesty to help others face many of the life lessons he has struggled to learn the hard way.

As the lights rise inside the San Rafael Theater, Hetfield smiles as he and filmmaker Justin Hunt make their way to the stage. A crowd of 300 applaud as the two men prepare to host an engaging question and answer session.

ABSENT, the documentary film that shines a revealing spotlight on the Father Wound left by absent and emotionally unavailable fathers, has just finished its one-night-only showing in Hetfield’s home of Marin County.

Last year Hetfield became attached to the documentary when Metallica’s management forwarded the request from director Justin Hunt for James’ participation. Three months later, Hunt’s email lead the documentarian to capture the most candid, personal, and insightful interview ever recorded of Metallica’s beloved frontman.

Hetfield, whose father Virgil abandoned him at 13, strips away any remnants of his rock star persona to speak truthfully about the lasting emotional damage his father’s leaving caused on his life.

Further adding to Hetfield’s personal challenges, at the age of 16 the future Icon of Metal lost his mother to cancer.

“I felt like a freak,” says Hetfield in a previous media interview while referring to his upbringing in the Christian Science religion. “We didn’t talk about anything health related. Nothing.”

Christian Science relies heavily on the belief of God’s healing power. Medical attention, doctors visits, and education of the body is not allowed. The body is a vessel, a mere mortal coil, and only serves the purpose to retain the soul.

Under the doctrine of Christian Science, God will heal you if you are meant to be healed. If not, then your death is pre-ordained by The Higher Power. Funerals and the grieving process are ignored. There is no reason for mourning under the blanket of Christian Science because your loved one’s soul lives on with the Lord.

When Hetfield’s mother dies, no funeral is held to help release James’ grief. His father, also a follower of Christian Science, is no longer a presence in James’ life. This resulted in Hetfield being alone at 16, and entrusted into the care of his older half-brother.

The despair from watching his mother slowly succumb to (at the time) an undisclosed terminal illness, and the anger from his father walking out on his family, fuels Hetfield’s teenage drinking and drives his need to excel in music.

As Hetfield and Hunt take their seats center stage, the applause die down. ABSENT’S emotionally charged message has the filmmaker’s desired effect: to open the door for dialog about the painful scars which remain by failed fathers, and the hope to bring strong fathers back into the family unit.

After a few brief words of thanks from Justin Hunt, the floor is opened for questions and no one wastes a sliver of time. Hands instantly shoot into the air.

Moderating the session is California Film Institutes’ Richard Peterson, who begins the session with the first question directed towards Justin Hunt, asking how [Hetfield and Hunt] connected to work on the project.

Justin explains it was through the help of a dear high school friend who was living in the Bay area. She, and her husband, assisted Hunt by getting his email to Metallica’s management.
Richard: James, it’s not the first time seeing the film is it?

James: No. I saw it once at home, by myself, and it was pretty moving. And then, (jokingly) I forced my wife to watch it. (Audience laughter) No, but she wanted to see it and it was great watching it with her.

It was really great sitting and watching it in a movie theater. It hit me even harder in here, especially the picture of my mom. It was tough. . . and my wife’s there holding my hand, squeezing it.

When Justin contacted me about this, our management gets hundreds of requests for things to involve us in. When they find out we are off tour there are all these extra [requests] that come in, and want to involve [us] in things. Maybe ten percent of the stuff makes it through the filter and we actually see the email. This was one that made total sense and I dove right into it.

At first, it was a question of do you want to narrate the film, or even be in it. Then, it was what should we do? I think with the interview, I guess [Justin] kind of chose to go with that. He thought it was powerful enough to put in the movie.

I really love that [ABSENT] wasn’t centered around Metallica, and all of that stuff. It was [me as] just another person in there telling my story.

Justin: Well, I think the angle James really brings to it, that was important to me, kind of parallels the stories of the prostitutes, in the sense that when you start at the end, you go backwards.

That is how I edited that piece [in the film]. You start with this one woman and you end with the massed grave in Albuquerque. If you kind of dissect that and go backwards, you see how if a father having made a good choice, and been engaged in his daughter’s life, she wouldn’t have become a prostitute. Thus, she wouldn’t have been in that situation and been one of the girls that was found in the grave.

It’s the same thing with James, but on a positive sense where he had a Father Wound. [James] got into music, became a part of this band, he formed this band and has touched millions of people because of it. It just goes to show the impact and how [the Father Wound] can be used for the good or for the bad.

As Hunt and Hetfield settle in for the Q and A, the first question from an audience member comes nervously with humor asking if it’s okay to call his rock idol by his first name. His joke hits the mark as the audience erupts into laughter.
.
James: (smiling) Yes, that is what my parent’s called me.

As the audience joins Hetfield in more laughter, the young man continues his question: How did the loss of James’ mother compare to the abandonment loss he felt from his father?

James: My father made a decision. He chose to leave and that hurts. That hurts more. You know, watching my mother wither away because of the rules of the “religion” was extremely difficult, and not being able to step up. Not even being able to say anything about it. The family was, you know, I hear from other families, (in a hushed voice) “we didn’t really talk about sex … or things like that..” [In my family] we didn’t talk about practically anything around health. [Watching] my mother just becoming so thin.

But the Father Wound of him leaving, and not saying good-bye, and showing up, like maybe a year later, in his sports car of some sort. [I think] he had a Sting Ray, saying, “Hey, come on lets go spend some money.” Meanwhile, [my mother, sister, and I] are living in poverty. It hurt a lot.

Justin Hunt nods in agreement to Hetfield’s answer as Richard Peterson moderates the next question from a single mother. She wonders what [advice] James will impart on his teenagers and if James felt he missed receiving [that advice] from his parents?

James: I have teenagers? (laughter) Almost. I would instill [in] them to be themselves. To speak honestly. To go with what feels right, and to ask us some questions. “What did you do? Do you know anything about that?” And if I don’t, I will tell them I don’t know. Maybe we can find out together [or] we can ask someone who does know.

That was a big wall with my father. I would ask him [a] question and he’d just, “Oh, blah, blah, blah, blah.” And it just sounded like blah, blah, blah. He didn’t know [the answer]. But, he couldn’t tell me that he did not know. It’s okay to not know. . . it’s also even better to find out together.

Justin to James: You have wonderful kids, by the way.

James to Justin: Thank you. It’s her fault, by the way. (James indicating his wife, Francesca, as the audience responds with laughter.)

As the audience settles from Hetfield’s playful acknowledgment towards his wife’s dedication to their children, a Metallica fan asks James if his statement from an old issue of the band’s fan club magazine still rings true: is your father still your hero and does he remain the big influence on your life, as previously stated?

James: Hmmm, that is great. The strength [of my father] that I talk about [in the So What issue] I see it now as fear. . . I’ll see myself crack down on my boy that way, as well. Bring down the hammer, and it’s not okay. It doesn’t help one bit. So that’s the strength.

There’s some good parts to that [kind of strength], there is also very, “this is the wrong message to teach him.” There’s much better ways to show him strength and standing up. . . like some of the people in the movie were saying, “stand up and protect your sisters. Stand up for your family. Show some assertiveness.”

Taking the anger and using it in a certain way instead of taking it out on your family, because it is so easy. They are there. They’re the ones you love and they will always love you, (jokingly adds) maybe, so you can take it out on them and they’ll always still be there, and that’s not right.

questions respectful to the topic at hand, and including filmmaker Hunt.

A woman from the middle of the theater took the somber moment to use her question to include Hunt in the session. While in line, a high school counselor shared his hope of learning ways to help his students cope with their own father issues. He wasn’t in line to see Hetfield, rather there to learn from the film’s content to give aid to his students: Are their plans to get ABSENT into high schools and show it to kids?

Justin: I have plans to get it into every hand. Every household we can get it into. Every high school, every church, every prison we can get it into. (Hetfield nods in agreement.)

A single father is selected by Richard for the next question. With a trembling voice, he starts by telling James how inspirational he has found his efforts to mesh together Hetfield’s family with his Metallica family, and jokes about his own struggles as a father by juggling taking a daughter to ballet, horseback riding, and still finding time to go to Metallica shows. He asks if by not having a father, did it help drive James to be a better father to his children?

James: That’s a good question. I was so scared to be a dad. I was waiting for the right lightening bolt to hit me with all the instructions, and all the sudden I knew how to do it, and what I was going to do. “Okay, this is going to be great. This is going to be easy.”

[My kids] have taught me more than I would have ever been able to teach them. They have taught me how to be the dad [and what] they need. I see what they need and, you know, the kids are pretty smart and manipulative. They can get what they need. But, I was a kid once as well and you can see the parts which are good for them, not so good for them, age appropriateness, all of that. And yes, you can ride your horse, go to ballet with your daughter, and show up at the Metallica concert anytime.

(Audience laughter)

As time slips away, Richard Peterson encourage the attendees to ask more concise questions in an attempt to take as many queries as possible. Richard selects another young man who inquires if Hetfield ever looks back on the hard times in his life and feels they have help him get to where he is now.

James: Absolutely. This is, kind of, the path I was put on by a higher power, of sorts. Through the struggle there is a story to tell. Like I said in the movie, relating to the struggle is more powerful than getting a bunch of answers on how to deal with a problem.

Relating to the struggle.

I think this movie, getting it to high schools, getting it to as many places as possible is important. It’s a universal thread. It might not hit everyone as powerful as it does, say me, or some other one who grew up without a father, but there’s people out there, and I was certainly one of them up to ten years ago, not even knowing that’s why [I was behaving this way].

Why am I doing these things? Why am I saying, “I’ll never do that,” and I’m doing it? I couldn’t put words to it. I couldn’t put a feeling to it, and just watching this movie, I mean, there is some potent stuff in that movie, and it is really allowed me to breathe better knowing I’m not alone. So the more people that see it, I think it’s going to give them some freedom.

Richard quickly moves to the next hand in a sea of many. Another young man starts by kidding with Hetfield, commenting he didn’t quite know what to expect from James’ involvement in a serious film about absent fathers.

Hetfield: (teasing back) It’s going to be awesome, dude.

After the audience’s laughter dies down, the young man continues his statement by divulging his own struggles with being a dad and that he enjoyed the film being centered around the struggles fathers can face.

Hetfield: Thank you, and kudos to you being a dad! Because it’s not easy. Truly, is not easy. There are days when I just think, “do I really wanna be here?” (laughing) I just want to run! And that’s okay to feel that. It’s totally fine. Talk to your spouse about that feeling or whoever is helping you, and even your kids ’cause they will be parents one day. It’s okay to feel like you gotta bolt. Get “you” time. That’s a part of the strength that people talk about.
As Richard selects the next person, a woman stands to ask of Hetfield how he creates fun with his children, as a way to better connect with them.

Hetfield: (leans forward, smiling) I tell you, kids plus water. It’s almost like the less they have the more fun, the more creative they can become, and they start working together with things. You know, buying them the hot new toy it certainly doesn’t satisfy. That’s getting thrown into that hole that they think they need to fill. The filling it is with family and enjoying those times together. But, yeah, going to the water has always been [good]. Swimming.”

Justin: I think if you want to create fun with your children then you just give them you. That’s all they need. It’s so misconstrued how providing certain things, buying certain things, that’s not it. It’s just giving them you. That’s all they need, and the fun will happen if you just give them that.

After a round of applauds, Richard repeats the question from a man wanting to know since James has reached the pinnacle of rock and roll, did he still need his father to validate his success, and if he did get validation, did it give James what he needed from his father.

James: It was tough because I would say, yes, he did, but it didn’t feel real because of all the stuff [abandoning the family] that had happened before that. It was around the Black album time, just before that, the Justice For All period, late 80′s, that [my dad] showed up.

There’s always that, “oh, he showed up because we’re famous” part that just never felt authentic. Never did. When I would go and visit him in the “house” that I bought [for my father], he would be asking me to sign things for people that he knew. It just felt so un-fatherlike.

Hetfield’s revelation about his father taking advantage of his son’s celebrity heavily impacts the crowd. Quietly, a question comes from the back, asking if being sober makes it more difficult for James to be a father.

James: Well, I would say, yes and no. With the alcohol I wouldn’t know. I wouldn’t know if it was better or not. [Life] was just a big haze. That was all my childhood was. Other people talking about, “I remember when I first rode my bike, and this and that.” I don’t remember any of that stuff, and it’s so sad. I’m tired of not remembering things. I want to be present. I want to be there, and I want to remember things.

Yes. It is difficult. It’s also great in that the extremes show up. This is me trying to be a normal person [without] the crutches.

Justin Hunt agrees with Hetfield’s comment as a women earnestly seeks James’ advice: How does one point out, or engage, without sounding too preachy, [a way] to nudge a failing father in the right direction?

James: That’s a great question. Really, the only natural and [non-evasive] way you can teach something [is] by example. My life, they can maybe see, “his life is better and I want that.” So, it has to be within, but nudges certainly help.

Justin: I think the thing that is cool, is that because of his level of popularity, and because of his music, people have [James] under a microscope and can see [his] story.

As far as my film is concerned. . . it does [help] open up dialog, and that is when you have an opportunity to approach someone and say, “you know, man, I watched coolest film the other day” and that is how you start the dialog.

James: And it is really ironic, the last thing a father wants to hear is, “you are not being a good father.” [That] opens the wound even further. It’s a catch 22, almost. Needing to discover themselves is pretty key.

Justin: That’s why it’s so cool that James is here because he’s become [a positive male role model] for a lot of people. On the [film's] website there’s some really touching letters to fathers. . . and a lot of them talk about how James filled that void in their lives through his music.

Don’t give up hope [that your children can't find] a positive male role model. That it can’t happen. Whether it’s a teacher, or whether it’s an uncle, it can happen.

Pressed for time, Richard moderates the next question for a gentleman wanting to know if being a successful rock star validates James, making him feel worthy, since his father didn’t.

James: The fame and fortune doesn’t fill the hole that a father leaves, or a mother, or anyone important in your life. At the end of the day relationships are what matters, and the stuff is just stuff. [The stuff] it breaks down. You can’t take it with you. It’s as simple as that. Nothing replaces [that bond]. No matter how poor a family is, if they’ve got a strong family bond and rely on each other, that’s a rich family.

Justin to James: Can I ask you a question? Would you say that’s kind of a cause and effect type thing. That maybe that’s why you worked so hard to be successful at music? Was to maybe get that?

James: To get validation?

Justin: Yeah, to fill the gap?

James: Well, I just think there was the drive. It’s possible. I mean, there’s lots of . . . well, there is people who will say other things. Getting the tattoos, getting the this, getting the that, there is always something that can be pinned on [seeking validation]. Part of it is character. Part of it is that. That makes up me. But, there was something. Some drive that came from somewhere [wanting] to be the best at what I can be.

A woman asks James while he is on the road touring, how does he make sure to stay available for his children.

James: Right. Very great question. I recall, I’d like to start by saying, 20 years ago, being on the road before having kids, looking at some of the road crew trying to contact [their] family on the rotary phone from Finland and can’t get through. . . I was just like, “whatever.” [Now] my heart goes out to them because they were trying their best to connect.

Nowadays, “hey, what time do you want to Face Time?” There are so many ways to connect with the family these days. Yeah, that’s looking at a dad on a little phone but being at home, I mean, we have scheduled our touring, now everyone in the band is a father so two weeks on, two weeks off is what we do. Nothing is going to make us stray from that ’cause it is very important. There is a very clear priority list and family’s at the top.

As the audience claps, clearly approving of Metallica’s devotion to their families, a young man wants to know since many people featured in ABSENT appear stuck in their Father Wounds, how did James grow out of his, and by learning to love his family what has his sober life been like in the past decade?

James: I’m certainly not cured and I don’t know “how to love.” I’m learning. Everyday is a learning process. Acceptance is a big part of that. Accepting, “I don’t want to be here right now,” but I’m going to be because I know it’s for the greater good.

That’s tough. That’s a tough one. I’m still working on all those things. But, without clarity, with all the other crutches I had, it wouldn’t be possible to even have awareness about it.

I’d go through with a fog, and maybe, get introduced to my kids when they’re 30 and say, “Hey, remember me?” That’s a horrible, horrible thought. I had a wonderful wife who basically kicked my ass when I was not showing up. She has helped me greatly to become a father, and show up.

I’d say one of the greatest gifts that I’d got was, maybe, five years into sobriety, getting a Father’s Day card from her saying that [she is] really proud of [me] showing up for [our] kids.

Hetfield’s touching recollection about his wife lingers as the last question of the night lightens the mood: By being in his children’s lives, has that been a kind of therapy for him?

James: There are parts when it’s therapy. There are parts when I need therapy. (Laughter from Hetfield, Hunt, and the audience). But, yes, absolutely. There’s extremes, and I live in an extreme world.

Going from having a father who was very strict, very religious, a minster in the church, and blah, blah, blah. Then, wanting to be the softest, greatest, cuddly dad. (Mass laughter from the audience.)That’s not good either! So, never say never on the strictness. It’s not real. I have to see both [sides] and find out where the middle is and get there.

The Q and A session closes with thunderous applause as Hetfield and Hunt take a moment to embrace. They rise from their seats, smiling, with Hetfield’s words still reverberating through the air.

James Hetfield, frontman to the world’s most successful metal band, who values honesty above all else, freely gave forty-seven minutes of his life to a modest gathering of people. Hetfield, by choosing to use his celebrity to focus attention on a humble documentary, has lent credence to the purpose of ABSENT: reclaiming fatherhood one man at a time.

As the audience stands, Justin Hunt makes a brief announcement he will stay behind if anyone would like to come down. Hetfield, spontaneously, decides to do the same.

An impromptu meet and greet, something all Metallica fans are familiar with, takes place at the base of the stage. Fans, excitedly and respectfully, line up eager to have their moment with Hetfield and Hunt.

An hour and a half later, both rock star and filmmaker remain, tending to the final remnants of the crowd.

Smiles are exchanged, photographs are taken, and autographs are signed.

Hetfield and Hunt refuse to leave until the last person is seen. Together, they ensure everyone’s chance to speak their mind, share their input, and shake the hand of James Hetfield, who at this moment is not a rock star. Instead, he is merely a proud father of three, doing his part, telling his truth in an attempt to inspire others to become the good father he has spent the last decade striving to be.


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